Back Pain Treatment: As You Age

As much as we try to fight the signs and symptoms of aging, some foes are greater than others. That certainly seems to be the case with back pain.

As we age, living with chronic back pain can become a daily struggle. By identifying the underlying cause for your pain, finding the right back pain remedy becomes a possibility.

What Are The Common Types Of Back Pain Associated With Aging?

Lower back pain is the most common amongst aging adults. Typically, symptoms include shooting or stabbing pain in the lower back, and may resolve on their own after a few days. In some cases, the pain can radiate to other parts of the body, such as the hips or legs. Sometimes, lower back pain can be severe enough to limit your mobility or range of motion or even prevent you from standing up straight.

A spinal problem in your upper back can also contribute to back pain symptoms. Usually, this pain is also accompanied by neck pain, and it can radiate to the shoulders and upper arms as well.

More often than not, back pain is a result of a host of factors; not a single one. As you age, your muscles lose elasticity, your bones lose strength, and your spine loses cushioning. Together, this degeneration of the body leads to lower back pain. Medical conditions such as arthritis, osteoporosis, viral infections, and other diseases can further contribute to the pain.

Injuries are another common cause of lower back pain. Doing something as simple as lifting a heavy object can strain your spine and cause a disc to rupture or bulge outward.

What Are Your Treatment Options?

The best back pain treatment is to rest and let your body heal itself. However, inactivity can also exacerbate back pain at your age, so don’t stay in bed longer than 2 days. After that, there is a plethora of back pain exercises that can help you regain complete mobility and also be effective in treating lower back pain. These also help to strengthen back and abdominal muscles so that you can prevent future back injuries and pain.

Start with gentle, low-impact exercises to prevent further damage. If your pain is chronic, alternative therapies for pain are worth looking into, as these don’t come with unwarranted side effects. Some good examples are: chiropractic care, acupuncture, biofeedback, and massage therapies.